Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Psoriasis solutions

Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease that begins in the gut and often involves the liver and other organs. Yep not the skin. The skin is only the elimination organ where it manifests. If you go through allopathic medicine (your GP or specialist) they will treat the skin and it might get better then it will come back and get worse each time and the creams get stronger each time. You are only treating the symptom. If your medical professional or advocacy group does not talk about nutrition and lifestyle I suggest you look for better information, one that is not influenced by a drug company.

The primary cause of this problem is dysbiosis in the gut. The probiotic bacteria are disturbed and dysfunctional. This can come about for a lot of reasons such as antibiotics, processed foods, other medications and even stress. Psoriasis is also an inflammatory disease linked with an increased risk of heat attack and some cancers, hence why it is obviously not a skin disease, it is chronic inflammation.

First thing to do is modify your diet to be unprocessed, lots of salad and raw food, no milk, minimal wheat and absolutely no white flour products. Cut down meat (it is pro inflammatory). No vegetable oil or margarines but lots of unprocessed olive oil. Lots of salad, nuts, vegetables, beans, fruit and oily fish. The best formula for eating is outlined in our book “the 6 week healthy eating planner" on our website (www.drdingle.com).

To build up the probiotics invest in some progurt (www.progurt.com) or lacto flora (from neways). These are the strongest source of human probiotics in the world and essential to heal the gut. Also get some digestive enzymes from a health food shop to help with the digestive process. The foods I mention above also provide prebiotics (the right type of fibre) to feed the good bacteria (and mould) in the gut.

Also get some fish oils from the health food store and have 3-4 (or more) a day along with vitamin C (minimum 500mg) and a good range of antioxidants. These are anti-inflammatory and are essential for skin health. Go outside in the sun to get some vitamin D.

If stress is an issue in your life take some strategies to minimize it such as meditation.
Once you have started on this then see a good naturopath to get more specifics for the person who has the problem.

While there are no guarantees it should take a few months to clear up but you might see some results within weeks.

29 comments:

  1. It is wise to read the lables and remember that topical application will soothe the symptom but not cure the illness. Look for a product that containc Zinc as it is a great natural skin healing agent.

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  2. i have had psoriasis for 20 years and peter, you are correct! Stress is a killer and so is not eating good raw food. i have just realised though, that if you have psoriasis on your scalp DON"T use conditioner. shampoo and get a good leave in conditioner just for the tips of your hair, or even a small bit of almond oil. it works and the scales literally disapear.

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  3. I have sufferred from psoriasis since I was 14 (now 31) and mainly get rashes on my face, scalp and little patches on my arms and legs. I find diet does play a big role in helping to reduce P symptoms, however, I am yet to experience remition, so I am still looking for more ways to try and improve managing P. Some things that have helped me along the way include:
    1. eating plenty of green salads at lunch time
    2. drinking 2 litres + of water a day
    3. eliminating wheat (gluten), dairy, citrus, corn (maize), processed foods, minimise alcohol and acid foods (tomatoes etc) from my diet.
    My only concern is I am missing out on other dietry requirements as a result i.e. calcium. It also makes life very boring and can be a little embarrassing at times when at functions and morning teas where food is provided for the majority.

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  4. Hi Anonymous,
    The most absorbable form of calcium is the bones of fish, so when you have a tin of salmon, crunch the bones as well! Also broccoli, red capsicum, almonds, heaps of fruit and veges.

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  5. I was told that psoriasis was hereditory and my dad, me and my son have it. But it is interesting that it may take an environmental thing to trigger it. Mine cleared up well on a diet such as you descrbe Peter, and plenty of sunshine and relaxation and exercise, i.e. when I'm on holidays. I think milk producs are particularly bad for it.

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  6. Thanks Melissa,
    I will add some of your suggestions to my diet.

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  7. The type of foods i have recommended have more than enough nutrirnts in them. In fact magnesium, which is rich in plants is one of the nutrient essential for calcium to be utilised in the body and we tend to be shorter in Magnesium than Calcium.

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  8. Thanks Dr Bingle. May I ask 1 question? The only processed foods I eat are dried cereal products, such as brown rice puffs or gluten free cereals, mainly from brown rice. Are these okay to eat or will they contribute to my psoriais? Thanks in advance.

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  9. any processed food is a potential problem, even if it is a rice product. best to keep it as unprocessed and raw as possible. processed cereals are about the worst thing we have added to our diet.
    sorry

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  10. I am vegetarian and have suffered badly with psoriais from the age of 8. Is there a vegetrian alternative to fish oil?

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  11. Flaxseed oil is an option. Make sure you purchase one that is in a dark, preferably glass bottle stored in the fridge. Flaxseed goes rancid easily and once it is rancid you must throw it out. It will just create a larger burden on your body. You need to have a reasonable amount for it to provide enough omega 3, 2 dessert spoons or 8 capsules should give you enough omega 3. Just watch your bowel movement as consuming this much oil tends to soften the bowel

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  12. Hi Dr Dingle,
    My partner has suffered from psoriasis for the past 20 years, but for some reason it has recently flared up. It is quite bad on his legs and elbows mainly. I really like your advice and I agree with you 100% I am looking forward to trying the natural approach rather than the drug approach, but in the mean time my Mum has given him some goats milk soap??? What is the best type of soap to use? Or is it best to not use anything?

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  13. Hi Dr Dingle, I have psoriasis and had my first outbreak at 24 (now 36). Since I was 24 my diet has been that which you advocate and I have always controlled psoriasis through diet and getting enough sun. However, after having my two children I got bad outbreaks on my hands as my body went through hormonal changes. I have found it can take 6 months or more to feel completely 'normal' again. During this time I have taken MSM (Methylsulfonylmethane) to help, and it works wonders. I believe it has the toxicity of water and it is manufactured by the body so it is not a completely foreign substance. Trouble is, no one here seems to know much about it, even the three naturopaths I have asked (I had to ask them to prescribe it to me and the only reason I know about it is someone I know was part of a trial in the US and had marvellous results). What I would like to know is whether there is any problem for breastfeeding mothers to take it, is it OK to change the recommended dose and take more intially given its low toxicity and do people with psoriasis have lower levels of MSM in their body at all times or only when it flares up? If it is all the time, even if no psoriasis is evident on the skin, can we take it daily during those times when good nutrition etc isn't enough? Would you also be able to tell me where to find more good information on MSM?

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  14. Good Morning Dr Dingle,

    Thank you so much for the very informative articles you have posted on your website relating to psoriasis.

    Having read the articles on your website and followed your advice, I have now been psoriasis free from about the beginning of March this year. All that is left is slight skin discolourations in some areas where it was at its worst. These however, are fading away.



    I developed psoriasis early last year. By October last year (when the above photos were taken) it was spreading and by December it covered my entire back, stomach, chest, legs, buttocks and scalp. Not as bad on my arms, but very bad on my elbows.



    The itch was almost unbearable, interrupting a full nights sleep with its intensity. Not to scratch is easier said than done. But any scratching resulted in bleeding.

    My scalp was a bit different than the lesions on my body. With my scalp it was more like a constant growth of a glue like substance with the consistency of wet pastry.



    My understanding from one of your articles was that the lesions were a symptom of the problem, not the cause of the problem. That the problem started in the gut due to an imbalance to the normal levels of bacteria.



    Taking this on board, I immediately stopped using the creams, liquids and tablets that had been prescribed to me by doctors and dermatologists.

    I made additions and deletions to my diet and my use of soaps and shampoos.

    It’s working just fine!


    Thank you very very much,

    Peter Alley

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  15. Hi Peter and thanks for your suggestions. I have been on a diet reducing processed foods and meat and no longer have patches of psoriasis. In fact I am now able to tolerate some dairy again. I prefer shampoo and conditioner with no SLS and use a herbal hair dye from the health food shop. Looks good and I'm sure it's less toxic than the dyes from supermarket.

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  16. As someone who controlled psoriasis successfully with diet I can highly recommend a book called 'Sweet Gratitude' (Matthew Rogers & Tiziana Alipo Tamborra) which has a range of incredibly delicious raw desserts. I simply stopped eating dessert when I changed my diet over 10 years ago but these creations can be eaten any time as they are made with ingredients that are not really associated with desserts. Some are made with irish moss, which is amazing for helping with psoriasis, both intestinally and topically. Generally, though it is a fantastic way to vary a mostly raw diet and get a wide range of powerful nutrients.

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  17. Hi,
    Is this the same solution for Excema ? I have bad excema on my right hand (palm and fingers)
    thanks

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  18. Anyone had any success with vitilgo?
    Anna

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  19. My 16 year old son has had recurring bouts of boils. When he stops antibiotics they reoccur. I would appreciate any suggestions

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  20. You can try these suggestions for eczema as see if there is an improvement :o)

    Boils are still an eruption from the body out through the skin. The infection takes place as the boil is being formed, therefore the antibiotics are not helping the cause but are controlling the symptom. Boils are caused by many things from chemical overload to acid imbalance in the digestive tract. I would suggest you visit a Naturopath for that to get a targeted result.

    Vitiligo can be made worse by an increase in stress, chemical exposure, thyroid disorder or a lack of B12 and folic acid. You will need to visit a Naturopath to formulate a lifestyle plan, because I am sure there is a lot of case history involved.

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  21. As a psoriasis sufferer for many years, I too have tried every cream on the market which only eased the skin problem. I have recently been educated about our diet being the basis of the problem. I am having trouble finding recipes for this new healthy lifestyle. Does anyone have some nice recipes or suggestions. Also I have oats for breakfast with lite milk and honey. Is this okay.

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  22. I believe that your Diet is specific to your blood group. The best suggestion I can offer is to cut out dairy, gluten, processed foods, alcohol and sugary foods and drink loads of water and eat loads of green salads (darker the better). I am not a qualified practitioner, just a psoriasis sufferer that has tried alot of different diets, creams etc. A really good cream I reccommend is called exorex (available from pharmacy) - this is non-steriod but does contain coal tar (Dr Dingle may not approve) but do suggest you use only during a mini detox for 2-4 weeks to help clean up your problem areas.

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  24. Hi there, I don't have psoriasis however my mother was sufferer. Anyway I have been having gut issues and a friend suggested I try Neways Lacto Flora. I had my first does last night and so did my 9 year old son (with same issues) and had very normal bowel motions today and hoping this may help us both. We have a pretty good diet, minimal processed foods, good oils and organic fruit and veggies. My question is do you think this product is addictive and also do the ingredients appear safe for particularly for a 10 year old. thanks Liz

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  25. Lacto flora and progurt (.com) are both fantastic probiotic products. I have no doubt that it will help. I suggest this to most people even if they think they dont have a problem.Eat a little bit more raw foods and some veggie juices if you want the full benefit.

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    1. Thank you, however do you feel that the Lacto Flora ingredients are safe as some of these names I have not heard of before. REgards, Liz

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  26. How do you recommend making progurt if you are avoiding dairy? Is it ok to use unsweetened almond milk?

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  27. To treat pictures of psoriasis in the body we should have avoid those foods and maintain a healthy diet. Thanks for the posts. please visit http://goo.gl/eaqSCu

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  28. I also take MSM for my psoriasis. It works great!

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