Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Improving Your Productivity and Achieving Peak Performance

Peak performance requires:

Flexibility
Endurance
Strength
Resilience
Creativity

The challenge of peak performance is to manage your physical, emotional, mental and spiritual energy. A long time ago, I thought you had only to manage physical energy to be highly productive, for example such as consuming some nutritious calories. But I was wrong.

Have a think for a minute. Despite having lots of calories have you ever felt low in energy? Or are there times when you seemed to have lots of energy and someone gives you a job you really don’t want to do, maybe your income tax and all of a sudden your energy disappears? Or you may recall a time when you had lots of energy but what you were doing went against your values or maybe someone raised an emotional issue that seemed to drain you. Your emotional or psychological energy is a product of your motivation. If our hearts aren’t in it we simply cannot raise our energy. Lack of passion ultimately affects energy. Have you ever noticed how much energy you have for a project depends upon your passion for the project? Have you experienced how tiring it becomes when you are doing something that you don’t want to do? For me it is marking exam papers. It puts me to sleep. However, writing my chapters and books really excites me so I have a lot more energy for it. In fact a whole day can disappear and I might not even notice it once I am writing. Sound familiar?

Stress and procrastination are great energy drains despite the fact that they do not manifest in the physical realm. That is why we need to build our energy reserves in the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual realms. “Spiritual” does not have to mean religious; I take it to mean consistent with your own higher values.

There are many blocks to increasing personal, professional and business productivity, including procrastination, lack of vision, being too busy, having no motivation or direction, stress and more. However, these all stem for two major areas: the way we think and our energy management. In a very simplistic way the level of energy we have and the way we think influence all our behaviour and are therefore at the root of all our problems and solutions.

We develop a personal energy crisis where our physical, emotional, psychological (mental) and spiritual batteries are totally depleted and at the end of each day we feel frustrated and exhausted, leading to a negative, spiralling problem of communication breakdown and conflict.

A simple formula for peak productivity is:

Productivity = Energy + Motivation and Direction

So how do you achieve productivity? First understand that your physical energy is simply a product of many aspects of your life, including your nutrition. Athletes use many strategies to achieve peak performance. Top athletes use more of them and focus on them more because top athletes cannot afford to make too many mistakes. Businesses also cannot afford to make too many mistakes. Individuals work long hard hours but don’t use any of these techniques. The performance demands of most professionals outstrip those of most professional athletes. Athletes have a professional career of five to 10 years if they’re lucky.

Thursday, December 8, 2011

BPA and plastics

A recent independent scientific report cautions women to avoid BPA to minimize their chances of breast cancer. The study said there was a "biological plausibility" that BPA is linked to breast cancer. Scientists can see a mechanism in animals by which certain substances, including BPA, might cause breast cancer, but there is not enough information to assess the risk in humans, the study said.

BPA is a harmful organic chemical compound which is used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. It is an environmental contaminant that disrupts reproductive processes through changing hormonal systems in the body. The effects of BPA have been studied on humans, however, There has been increased awareness of the health related risks to BPA exposure, due to recent research into its environmental distribution and its detection in humans. A recent US study found 91% have traces of BPA.

The main source of human exposure is from food and drink that has been in contact with materials containing BPA such as plastic food and drink containers. Food and beverage containers and culinary utensils are manufactured from polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. These resins are used as linings for metal products including bottletops, food cans and water supply pipes.

Studies have suggested that BPA is associated with a number of serious health effects including; causing cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and also reproductive abnormalities. BPA is also known as an endocrine disruptor, which can interfere with reproduction and development. Fetuses, infants and children are usually more susceptible than adults, due to their fast developmental stages. There is a considerable amount of evidence now that exposure to certain environmental factors in early stages of development promote the risk of numerous chronic diseases in adulthood. Research has recently highlighted the estrogen‑like and carcinogenic adverse effects of BPA and there have been increased incidences of accelerated growth and puberty linked to BPA exposure.

One of the studies carried out on the effects of BPA exposure on pregnant women and the fetus which showed BPA caused prenatal and or postnatal reproductive issues. The ability for a fetal liver to detoxify BPA is much less than that of an adult. However, studies have also shown that 8PA increases infant bodyweight due to its estrogen‑like effects. It has been recorded that there is a link between serum BPA levels and recurring miscarriage. In one study patients with a history of three of consecutive first trimester miscarriages had blood BPA levels of around three times higher than the control group with no history of miscarriage or infertility.

Monday, December 5, 2011

Lead: A Toxic Case Study

Lead is the most widely used heavy metal and a deadly toxin that has become widespread in our modern world. Lead is a neurotoxin with a long history of causing damage to the human brain, from Roman times due to lead (Pb –Latin name plumbum) in drinking vessels, through eighteenth century ‘Devonshire colic’ where cider was poisoned with lead in its manufacture, to present day occupational exposure in the lead additive and battery manufacturing industry. Some historians put the demise of the Roman empire down to the high levels of lead in the aristocracy of Rome which may have contributed to madness such as Nero playing the fiddle as Rome burnt. Before the Industrial Revolution lead poisoning commonly occurred due to adulterated food or wine, or from occupational hazards such as mining or smelting.


Naturally lead is slowly released into the environment through the weathering of rocks, igneous (volcanic) activity and through radioactive decay of naturally occurring radon gas to form the isotope 210Pb. It is a heavy pliable and resistant to corrosion and weathering. These characteristics, as well as its plentiful and accessible supply and ease to smelt, have enabled humans to use it for thousands of years. Some lead artifacts have been dated back to 6500 BC. The Romans produced approximately 80,000 tons of lead annually and were known to increase the environmental lead approximately five times the background level, and as far back as 4,500 years ago in South East Asia, when methods of smelting for lead sulphide ores and cupellation of silver were developed, widespread atmospheric lead contamination occurred.


Lead is the only heavy metal whose open-ocean concentration has been measurably influenced by civilisation. The lead content of the open ocean (Mediterranean and Pacific) has increased 3 to 5 times since the introduction of lead-based gasoline additives and 10 times since pre-industrial times. The significance of these increases in global lead concentration is very difficult to assess. There is a growing concentration of lead found in the tissues of fish, especially shell fish, and in other food, but the effect on global ecosystem processes would be nearly impossible to assess as there are huge problems in determining what is ‘normal’ when the global ecosystem is now relatively drenched in lead compared with pre-industrial times. The extent of global lead is best seen in the fact that an emission product has been diluted into the open oceans and increased in concentration dramatically, yet most lead emissions do not normally reach the oceans but are deposited on the land, particularly in cities where most of us live.


Traditional uses of lead have included building, plumbing, printing, fishing, shooting and uses as weights with the additional present day use in radiation and electrical insulation, battery manufacture with various compounds of lead being used in paints, plastics, ceramics, glass and unfortunately petrol. Historically there have been three major sources of exposure of large populations to lead. Lead paint in older homes, lead in products like jewelry and crystal and lead added to petrol.


While lead was slowly removed from petrol over 25 years, it will remain as an environmental contaminant in the form of fine dust for many more decades and the controversy around it will last even longer. Lead was added to petrol as tetra ethyl and tetra methyl lead (two highly toxic forms) primarily to boost octane ratings. Lead was emitted to the atmosphere from motor vehicle exhausts as volatile lead compounds, unburnt tetra-ethyl lead and as particulates such as lead oxide. Around 70% of these particles are less than 0.1 micron in size which are easily dispersed over large distances and the size most dangerous to human health. Particles below 0.1 micron in size can pass into the lower parts of the lungs where they do most damage.


Automotive exhausts were the major contributors to lead emissions in most cities around the world, although other sources include paint and factory emissions. In the USA it is estimated that between 90 and 98 per cent of total lead emissions are from car exhausts and in Australia it has been estimated that about 98% of lead emissions came from lead in petrol, though the lead added to petrol only represented 14% of total lead usage.


Australia was one of the last developed countries to remove lead from petrol (almost 20 years after the USA). This was despite the toxic effects of lead being known as far back as the 1950s. Leaded petrol was phased out in Australia between 1986 and 2002. Australia has an influential lead industry (the largest lead mines in the world) that fought tooth and nail alongside the petrol industry and certain government departments to keep the lead in petrol. Shamefully, the health of the average person is usually not a consideration when weighed against the “health” of the economy when large amounts of money are at stake. The result of this reluctance to act means that even still many more Australians now have elevated levels of lead in their bodies and many children have been unnecessarily exposed to this toxic metal.


Although the amount of lead has decreased in road dust and soil lead is still found as a contaminant in the dust in our homes, usually near the entrance where it is brought in on people’s shoes. This contaminated dust will accumulate in carpets, where the possibility of it being ingested or being transferred to the skin is increased, especially if the dust particles are stirred. When we studied the amounts of lead in carpets we found the highest levels near the front door. The closer the house was to a busy road or a petrol station, the higher the level of lead.


Lead can cause very serious health problems, including damage to the nervous system, leading to behavioural changes and a decreased mental ability, inhibition of enzymes, interference with the growing foetus, colic, anaemia and kidney damage. Infants and young children are the groups most susceptible to lead exposure. Even at low levels, lead poisoning in children can cause significant IQ deficiencies, reading and learning disabilities, impaired hearing, reduced attention spans and hyperactivity and other behaviour problems. A lot like ADHD symptoms. Pregnant women poisoned by lead can transfer lead to the developing foetus, resulting in adverse developmental effects including increased levels of spontaneous abortion and still-born babies. One study found a strong correlation with prenatal lead exposure and violent offences and arrests later in life and lead exposure in utero will result in poor intellect in children, especially when exposed around 28 weeks of gestation when development is most crucial.


Schizophrenia has also been associated with exposure to lead in the foetus. In one study mothers with high‑lead blood samples were more than twice as likely to have children who later became schizophrenic. As a result they estimate that up to a quarter of the schizophrenia that developed in American urban centres in the 1950s and 1960s could be traced to lead pollution in the womb. Maybe the levels in Australia were even higher as a result of our lax controls.


Another sensitive issue is what levels of lead in the body are safe for kids. According to the grandfather of lead research Dr Needleman, ‘none’. Needleman had done literally decades of work on the toxic effects of lead on kids and had concluded there is no safe level and children are the most vulnerable to its toxic effects. However, as a result of the powerful lead industry the levels of lead acceptable in the blood were around 35ug/dl of blood. In the mid 80’s it was reduced to 25, then to 10 and now levels of 5 ug/dl or above are considered not acceptable. In one situation I was involved in however, the government officials tried to argue the child did not have a problem because the levels were 4.9 ug/dl. Clearly they were very good at reading numbers but not at understanding the effects of toxic chemicals such as lead and how standards should be used including how lead levels fluctuate in the blood and the effects of lead accumulation in the body.


Dust from lead-based paints continues to pose a health problem. Although these paints were banned from indoor use decades ago, people with older homes are still being exposed to lead dust, another legacy of complacent governments. More than 80 percent of homes built before 1978 contain lead paint. It was the primary component (up to 40 percent) of white paint in Australia until the 1960s. In homes built before 1950, white lead-based paints were used as undercoats on interior and exterior timbers and walls and as a prime coat for troweled lath and plaster walls and cement rendered surfaces. One study estimated that 38 million houses in the US had lead-based paint on their walls. How many in Australia? Since then, modern paints have turned from using lead based to titanium dioxide and latex products. Unfortunately lead based paints are still used in many developing countries.


Small quantities of dust are continually produced from lead paint, settling on indoor surfaces. During periods of home renovation, there is an increase in the number of cases of lead poisoning reported. Researchers have found the household dust of recently renovated homes contains lead levels of 12,600 mg/m2. This is thousands of times higher than the normal background level. In a recent incident, a family keen to renovate an older house was assured that the old paint on the outside of their home was not lead based. At the end of the first day of paint stripping, there was a layer of fine paint dust inside the home and in the new baby’s room. Fortunately the mother listened to her intuition and had the dust tested. It was laden with lead. In this case the family acted quickly to avert potentially grave health problems. It is essential to have paint tested before you remove it if you think there may be any possibility of it being lead based. This is simple and inexpensive as the test kits are available from any reputable hardware or paint shop. Don’t assume it will be fine. It is essential to test it and be sure. The best thing to do with most lead painted surfaces is to just paint over it. It will not be released with a few extra coats of paint over it.


Another concern is the use of lead in common consumer items. In particular the use of lead paint or contamination of children’s products and toys with lead. There is growing evidence and concern over the unregulated products coming into Australia from Asia. Many are made from cheaper metals and paints and may be contaminated or even used heavy metals such as lead and cadmium in their production. I have found jewelry with high concentrations of both lead and cadmium.


Ironically we add lead oxide to the molten glass to form lead crystal. The lead leaches out into liquids fairly rapidly but increases with alcoholic content and acidity. The longer the wine or drink is left in the crystal the higher the concentrations but it only takes a few minutes for the lead to begin leaching into the crystal. Lead may also be a lesser component of pewter but the same principles will apply for it migrating into foods and drink as crystal.


Lead also makes its way into cosmetics, particularly, hair dyes, eye shadow and lipsticks. Metal salts dyes, most commonly lead and bismuth (another toxic metal) salts, are used to create a reaction to dye the hair. Metal salts gradually darken the hair over time and are used in black-brown colours. Strangely lead salts have been approved as safe for use as hair dyes in the low concentrations. Remember, there is no safe level of lead, but for beauty’s sake it seems ok?


Lead in drinking water is not a new phenomenon as lead was historically used to make water pipes and has even been contributed to be a factor of the Roman Empire's demise. Although lead pipes are no longer produced, some older homes may still contain lead pipes and thus contaminate the drinking water. Lead in tap water may also increase due to leaching of lead-bearing materials such as solders.


Lead has also been found to accumulate in the soil of orchards where crop sprays containing lead compounds have been used such as apple and pear orchards sprayed with lead arsenate. The concern here is the encroaching urban sprawl as we build new homes on old horticultural or old industrial areas without anyone being the wiser on what is in the soils.


Whilst we have become smarter when dealing with lead, and it no longer affects our IQ, the possibility of future contamination still lingers as long as we accept it in our products. No level of lead, mercury or cadmium is acceptable, and therefore the only acceptable solution is to remove them from all environmental, household and personal care products.

Monday, November 28, 2011

Stress the silent killer

“Not everything that matters can be measured, and not everything that is measured matters.” – Elliot Eisner

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the number one cause of death globally. In 2008, more than 17 million people died from them. On a national level, based on the 2004-2005 National Health Survey, 3.7 million Australians are estimated to have existing cardiovascular problems; CVDs were the direct cause of 35% of total mortality in 2005, again the number one cause of death 1,2. This is despite the billions of dollars spent on medications to reduce the risk and intensity of cardiovascular diseases 3. CVD is no longer considered a disorder of lipid (fat) accumulation, but rather a disease process characterized by low-grade inflammation of the vascular (artery) lining and an inappropriate wound healing of the blood vessels. The answer is to treat the cause of inflammation not cholesterol.
A study in 2004 known as the INTERHEART study found that 90% of all myocardial infarctions (heart attacks) could be attributed to nine potentially modifiable risk factors 4,5. These factors include tobacco use, atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, abdominal obesity, psychosocial factors, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and poor diets 4,6.
Despite convincing evidence linking psychosocial factors such as chronic and acute stress to the risks of cardiovascular disease 7,8,9, there remains a lack of focus on stress reduction for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Risk reduction for stress is low-cost, simple to administer, and “non-pharmaceutical” 10.
Stress is the failure of an individual to cope with an emotional or physical threat. It results in both psychological and physical effects on individuals by means of two main stress groups: acute stress and chronic stress. Chronic stress occurs from exposure to stressors such as family, society (traffic, population, etc.) and, almost all the time, the workplace. When the body is stressed, a large number of biological and chemical processes can occur that put the body at increased risk of CVD. Chemical mediators are released, which cause the prolonged activation of the sympathetic nervous system 7 and increase heart rate and blood pressure, which puts a lot of strain on the heart and cardiovascular system 11. Over time, the strain on the system leads to deterioration of the heart muscle, arteries and vessels 11. Chemical mediators can also result in sleep deprivation, elevated cortisol levels, elevated insulin and blood glucose levels and increases in ghrelin, the hormone that increases appetite 11.

Chronic stress, which is what we are often confronted with in our daily busy lives, plays a huge role in these increases, as it can cause the prolonged activation of the sympathetic nervous system 7. This results in an increase in blood pressure and heart rate, which remain elevated, leading to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. In extreme circumstances this is also linked with endothelial dysfunction (inability of arteries to dilate) and possible necrosis of artery walls 7.
Stress increases the release of hormones like cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline, which act to increase the heart rate and contractile volume, as well as constricting arteries in the gastrointestinal tract, whilst dilating those in the periphery. Aldosterone and vasopressin, two lesser hormones in the stress response, are also released and act to increase blood volume through increased water retention. One of the functions of cortisol is to increase the concentration of fatty acids carried by lipoproteins and sugars in the bloodstream, leading to more damage to the arterial wall, producing excessive levels of cholesterol that may then bond to the artery walls (and lead to high cholesterol readings by your doctor), a process called atherosclerosis 12. Atherosclerosis is the process in which a blood vessel wall thickens due to a build-up of fatty substances. The combined effect of these hormones is a marked increase in blood pressure, which may over time result in damage to the vascular tissue in the form of small micro-tears in the vessel walls. These minute tears heal by bonding with molecules floating in the blood (that is, cholesterol acts as a Bandaid). This cholesterol then forms a hard fibrous plaque with calcium, which may build up over time, constricting blood flow in the artery. Stress also causes the blood to become stickier in preparation of potential injury, increasing the likelihood of an artery clogging blood clot 13. One study found that those who expressed feeling high levels of stress and despair had a 20% greater chance of developing atherosclerosis over a four-year period. This was the same magnitude of increased risk as seen in a pack-a-day smoker. Studies on animals have shown similar results. A study on hypertensive rats and normal rats found that the hypertensive rats suffering from stress had a higher rate of these events 14.
There is a large body of evidence demonstrating the relationship between increased stress and increased CVD. A study commenced before the terrorist attacks in the U.S. on September 11, 2001 examined the degree to which acute stress reactions as a result of the terrorist attacks could predict future cardiovascular outcomes through follow-up surveys over three years 15. In a sample of 2,592 adults, researchers found that the acute stress response was associated with a 53% increased incidence of cardiovascular ailments 15. Those individuals who had high levels of acute stress following the attacks also reported a two-fold increase in physician-diagnosed hypertension and a three-fold increase in other heart-related problems over the three-year period.
In a study of 11,119 patients found that those patients who had experienced a myocardial infarction reported a higher prevalence of all four stress factors: stress at home, stress at work, financial stress and major life events in the prior year 16. The study also found that the four stress factors worsened coronary atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction and increased inflammation 16.
The Whitehall II study found a 2.15-fold (215%) increased risk for cardiovascular disease in men who experienced a disparity between effort and reward at work 17. The study also concluded that high-risk individuals included those who were overcommitted at work, had poor promotion prospects, blocked or stalled careers as well as competitive and hostile work environments. Similarly, in a study of nearly two thousand male workers over a six-year period, researchers found that those who experienced chronic work-related stress were four times more likely to experience cardiovascular ailments 16. A study at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre in Boston found evidence that managers who fire someone run twice the usual risk of heart attack in the week following the dismissal; the greatest danger occurred to those who had conducted the firing while working under a high-pressure deadline. Another study found that chronic work stress and divorce increased the risk of cardiovascular mortality 17.
In a study of 791 patients, researchers reported that high-pressure deadlines increased the risk of heart attacks by 2.3 times within the seven days after the stress of the deadlines. Specific time pressures dramatically increase the risk of heart attack and early death. In a study of 60 women ages 30 to 45, researchers found that those under stress who secreted the highest levels of cortisol were also the ones who turned to high-fat foods in attempts to cope with their stress.
The results are similar for younger populations. In a study of 158 healthy adolescents who undertook self-report measures of chronic stress over 3.3 years, adolescents exposed to chronic, negative stressors that worsened over time demonstrated heightened cardiovascular risk 18. In a study investigating the responses of university students to stressful situations, researchers found that students exposed to stressful laboratory tasks displayed high levels of cardiovascular responses, which extended into a continued increase in blood pressure during instances of perceived stress in everyday life situations 19.
Being angry more than doubles the risk of cardiac arrest. In a study of 1,500 people who had suffered heart attacks who were surveyed and asked what their feelings were a few hours prior to the heart attack, it was found that the heightened risk appears to last for about two hours after the episode of anger.
Psychosocial stress also results in changes in physiological behaviours 5,7,11, which can put a person at increased risk of CVD. These behaviours include increased smoking and drinking, unhealthy eating and reductions in physical activity 20,21,22. In addition, chronic stress can lead to constrained appetites or overeating, leading to problems of anorexia or obesity 23. In extreme cases, anorexia or extreme weight loss can have an effect on heart rhythms and even lead to heart failure 2010, while overeating may lead to obesity that has significant health risks associated with coronary heart disease, hypertension and type 2 diabetes 25.
Stress is our great silent killer. Despite the growing body of evidence of this, we continue to focus on pharmaceutical treatments to reduce CVD and we continue to fail. The mechanisms behind stress being such a large contributing factor are now understood and numerous major studies have shown that the effects of chronic stress increase the risk from two to nine times. By contrast, medication to reduce cholesterol reduces the risk by 1% or 0.001 times (that is more than 2,000 times less important than stress). The next stage then is to invest in stress management practices. It’s that simple. Or is it?
1. NHMRC 2009
2. Bonthuis et al. 2010
3. Ademi et al. 2009
4. Yusef et al. 2004
5. Dimsdale 2008
6. Begg et al. 2008).
7. Rozanski et al. 1999
8. Black and Gabutt 2002
9. Siegrist 1995
10. Cade et al. 2010).
11. McEwen 2008
12. Brotman et al. 2007
13. Newton et al. 1990
14. Hallb├Ąck and Folkow 2008
15. Holam et al. 2008
16. Rosengren et al. 2004
17. Dimsdale 2007
18. Low et al. 2009
19. Loft et al. 2007
20. Sturmer et al. 2006
21. Logan and Barksdale 2008
22. Hamer, Bates and Mishra 2011
23. Rutledge and Linden 1997
24. Bell 2010
25. Rapoport, Clark and Wardle 2000

Acknowledgements. Brigitta Curley, Amy Williams

Monday, November 21, 2011

Dr Dingle's Workplace Wellness

Dr Dingle’s
Workplace Wellness
The Cost of Poor Health Is Killing Your
Business
People are a workplaces most important asset and their health and wellness will determine how productive they are. Salaries make up 90-99% of most companies running costs if employees are not functioning at optimal physical and psychological health then organisations are losing a lot of money. Just a small decrease in health and wellbeing of employees can result in significant cost to employers, tens of thousands of dollars a year.
The cost of poor health on personal and professional productivity is high. And includes stress, absenteeism, injuries, sick leave, disability, accidents, mistakes, litigation and insurance, fatigue, low morale, low productivity, poor concentration and focus, low output, disruption of other workers and a lot more.
The Benefits of Workplace Wellness Programs
More than 300 studies and hundreds of hours of our research has shown workplace wellness to give organisations a positive return on investment and is an employers most important investment with improved organizational productivity and increased profitability. The potential cost savings for organisations is estimated to be around $3000.00 per employee per year and have a return of around $7 or more for every $1 invested.
The benefits of our workplace wellness programs include reduced sick leave and absenteeism, increased productivity and capacity, morale, attention and focus, employee self image and esteem, employee retention and attraction, positive work culture and job satisfaction and improved quality of life.
Let us improve your workplace wellness by offering you| Health and wellness assessments

| Fun presentations and seminars
| Group and individual health coaching
| Do it yourself workplace tools and wellness packs
| A wellness program that suits your organisation
Our programs are designed specifically to meet your organisation requirements and are holistic and focus on preventative and sustainable health and well-being.
Our programs include combinations of modules to
suit you and can include
| Increase your energy and productivity | Stress less and maintain your focus| Tackling obesity, and weight loss| 7 secrets of healthy eating
| Achieving balance in your workplace| Mental health and positive psychology in the workplace | Overcoming poor sleep and fatigue| Achieving your personal and professional potential| Smoking cessation| Managing diabetes and cardio vascular disease| Positive psychology in the workplace
We develop our workplace wellness programs to suit each individual workplace.Why Invest in Dr Dingle’s Workplace Wellness?
Our work is based on 25 years of our own university based research at
Murdoch University and practice into coaching for health and wellbeing in the workplace, with an integrated holistic approach using a combination of tried and tested tools.

Our team is made up of health professionals in research, naturopathy and other integrated health modalities. We have exceptional presenters and facilitators.
Executive Productivity and Health Coaching.
Dr Peter Dingle and Martine Dingle (ND) also does personal executive wellbeing coaching for professional people who want to be better at what they do and to get more out of their life.
For full details and more information contact Dr Peter Dingle
Phone 0414360569
Email peter@drdingle.com Or visit
www.drdingle.com

Lead, A Toxic Case Study

Lead is the most widely used heavy metal and a deadly toxin that has become widespread in our modern world. Lead is a neurotoxin with a long history of causing damage to the human brain, from Roman times due to lead (Pb –Latin name plumbum) in drinking vessels, through eighteenth century ‘Devonshire colic’ where cider was poisoned with lead in its manufacture, to present day occupational exposure in the lead additive and battery manufacturing industry. Some historians put the demise of the Roman empire down to the high levels of lead in the aristocracy of Rome which may have contributed to madness such as Nero playing the fiddle as Rome burnt. Before the Industrial Revolution lead poisoning commonly occurred due to adulterated food or wine, or from occupational hazards such as mining or smelting.

Naturally lead is slowly released into the environment through the weathering of rocks, igneous (volcanic) activity and through radioactive decay of naturally occurring radon gas to form the isotope 210Pb. It is a heavy pliable and resistant to corrosion and weathering. These characteristics, as well as its plentiful and accessible supply and ease to smelt, have enabled humans to use it for thousands of years. Some lead artifacts have been dated back to 6500 BC. The Romans produced approximately 80,000 tons of lead annually and were known to increase the environmental lead approximately five times the background level, and as far back as 4,500 years ago in South East Asia, when methods of smelting for lead sulphide ores and cupellation of silver were developed, widespread atmospheric lead contamination occurred.

Lead is the only heavy metal whose open-ocean concentration has been measurably influenced by civilisation. The lead content of the open ocean (Mediterranean and Pacific) has increased 3 to 5 times since the introduction of lead-based gasoline additives and 10 times since pre-industrial times. The significance of these increases in global lead concentration is very difficult to assess. There is a growing concentration of lead found in the tissues of fish, especially shell fish, and in other food, but the effect on global ecosystem processes would be nearly impossible to assess as there are huge problems in determining what is ‘normal’ when the global ecosystem is now relatively drenched in lead compared with pre-industrial times. The extent of global lead is best seen in the fact that an emission product has been diluted into the open oceans and increased in concentration dramatically, yet most lead emissions do not normally reach the oceans but are deposited on the land, particularly in cities where most of us live.

Traditional uses of lead have included building, plumbing, printing, fishing, shooting and uses as weights with the additional present day use in radiation and electrical insulation, battery manufacture with various compounds of lead being used in paints, plastics, ceramics, glass and unfortunately petrol. Historically there have been three major sources of exposure of large populations to lead. Lead paint in older homes, lead in products like jewelry and crystal and lead added to petrol.

While lead was slowly removed from petrol over 25 years, it will remain as an environmental contaminant in the form of fine dust for many more decades and the controversy around it will last even longer. Lead was added to petrol as tetra ethyl and tetra methyl lead (two highly toxic forms) primarily to boost octane ratings. Lead was emitted to the atmosphere from motor vehicle exhausts as volatile lead compounds, unburnt tetra-ethyl lead and as particulates such as lead oxide. Around 70% of these particles are less than 0.1 micron in size which are easily dispersed over large distances and the size most dangerous to human health. Particles below 0.1 micron in size can pass into the lower parts of the lungs where they do most damage.

Automotive exhausts were the major contributors to lead emissions in most cities around the world, although other sources include paint and factory emissions. In the USA it is estimated that between 90 and 98 per cent of total lead emissions are from car exhausts and in Australia it has been estimated that about 98% of lead emissions came from lead in petrol, though the lead added to petrol only represented 14% of total lead usage.

Australia was one of the last developed countries to remove lead from petrol (almost 20 years after the USA). This was despite the toxic effects of lead being known as far back as the 1950s. Leaded petrol was phased out in Australia between 1986 and 2002. Australia has an influential lead industry (the largest lead mines in the world) that fought tooth and nail alongside the petrol industry and certain government departments to keep the lead in petrol. Shamefully, the health of the average person is usually not a consideration when weighed against the “health” of the economy when large amounts of money are at stake. The result of this reluctance to act means that even still many more Australians now have elevated levels of lead in their bodies and many children have been unnecessarily exposed to this toxic metal.

Although the amount of lead has decreased in road dust and soil lead is still found as a contaminant in the dust in our homes, usually near the entrance where it is brought in on people’s shoes. This contaminated dust will accumulate in carpets, where the possibility of it being ingested or being transferred to the skin is increased, especially if the dust particles are stirred. When we studied the amounts of lead in carpets we found the highest levels near the front door. The closer the house was to a busy road or a petrol station, the higher the level of lead.

Lead can cause very serious health problems, including damage to the nervous system, leading to behavioural changes and a decreased mental ability, inhibition of enzymes, interference with the growing foetus, colic, anaemia and kidney damage. Infants and young children are the groups most susceptible to lead exposure. Even at low levels, lead poisoning in children can cause significant IQ deficiencies, reading and learning disabilities, impaired hearing, reduced attention spans and hyperactivity and other behaviour problems. A lot like ADHD symptoms. Pregnant women poisoned by lead can transfer lead to the developing foetus, resulting in adverse developmental effects including increased levels of spontaneous abortion and still-born babies. One study found a strong correlation with prenatal lead exposure and violent offences and arrests later in life and lead exposure in utero will result in poor intellect in children, especially when exposed around 28 weeks of gestation when development is most crucial.

Schizophrenia has also been associated with exposure to lead in the foetus. In one study mothers with high‑lead blood samples were more than twice as likely to have children who later became schizophrenic. As a result they estimate that up to a quarter of the schizophrenia that developed in American urban centres in the 1950s and 1960s could be traced to lead pollution in the womb. Maybe the levels in Australia were even higher as a result of our lax controls.

Another sensitive issue is what levels of lead in the body are safe for kids. According to the grandfather of lead research Dr Needleman, ‘none’. Needleman had done literally decades of work on the toxic effects of lead on kids and had concluded there is no safe level and children are the most vulnerable to its toxic effects. However, as a result of the powerful lead industry the levels of lead acceptable in the blood were around 35ug/dl of blood. In the mid 80’s it was reduced to 25, then to 10 and now levels of 5 ug/dl or above are considered not acceptable. In one situation I was involved in however, the government officials tried to argue the child did not have a problem because the levels were 4.9 ug/dl. Clearly they were very good at reading numbers but not at understanding the effects of toxic chemicals such as lead and how standards should be used including how lead levels fluctuate in the blood and the effects of lead accumulation in the body.

Dust from lead-based paints continues to pose a health problem. Although these paints were banned from indoor use decades ago, people with older homes are still being exposed to lead dust, another legacy of complacent governments. More than 80 percent of homes built before 1978 contain lead paint. It was the primary component (up to 40 percent) of white paint in Australia until the 1960s. In homes built before 1950, white lead-based paints were used as undercoats on interior and exterior timbers and walls and as a prime coat for troweled lath and plaster walls and cement rendered surfaces. One study estimated that 38 million houses in the US had lead-based paint on their walls. How many in Australia? Since then, modern paints have turned from using lead based to titanium dioxide and latex products. Unfortunately lead based paints are still used in many developing countries.

Small quantities of dust are continually produced from lead paint, settling on indoor surfaces. During periods of home renovation, there is an increase in the number of cases of lead poisoning reported. Researchers have found the household dust of recently renovated homes contains lead levels of 12,600 mg/m2. This is thousands of times higher than the normal background level. In a recent incident, a family keen to renovate an older house was assured that the old paint on the outside of their home was not lead based. At the end of the first day of paint stripping, there was a layer of fine paint dust inside the home and in the new baby’s room. Fortunately the mother listened to her intuition and had the dust tested. It was laden with lead. In this case the family acted quickly to avert potentially grave health problems. It is essential to have paint tested before you remove it if you think there may be any possibility of it being lead based. This is simple and inexpensive as the test kits are available from any reputable hardware or paint shop. Don’t assume it will be fine. It is essential to test it and be sure. The best thing to do with most lead painted surfaces is to just paint over it. It will not be released with a few extra coats of paint over it.

Another concern is the use of lead in common consumer items. In particular the use of lead paint or contamination of children’s products and toys with lead. There is growing evidence and concern over the unregulated products coming into Australia from Asia. Many are made from cheaper metals and paints and may be contaminated or even used heavy metals such as lead and cadmium in their production. I have found jewelry with high concentrations of both lead and cadmium.

Ironically we add lead oxide to the molten glass to form lead crystal. The lead leaches out into liquids fairly rapidly but increases with alcoholic content and acidity. The longer the wine or drink is left in the crystal the higher the concentrations but it only takes a few minutes for the lead to begin leaching into the crystal. Lead may also be a lesser component of pewter but the same principles will apply for it migrating into foods and drink as crystal.

Lead also makes its way into cosmetics, particularly, hair dyes, eye shadow and lipsticks. Metal salts dyes, most commonly lead and bismuth (another toxic metal) salts, are used to create a reaction to dye the hair. Metal salts gradually darken the hair over time and are used in black-brown colours. Strangely lead salts have been approved as safe for use as hair dyes in the low concentrations. Remember, there is no safe level of lead, but for beauty’s sake it seems ok?

Lead in drinking water is not a new phenomenon as lead was historically used to make water pipes and has even been contributed to be a factor of the Roman Empire's demise. Although lead pipes are no longer produced, some older homes may still contain lead pipes and thus contaminate the drinking water. Lead in tap water may also increase due to leaching of lead-bearing materials such as solders.

Lead has also been found to accumulate in the soil of orchards where crop sprays containing lead compounds have been used such as apple and pear orchards sprayed with lead arsenate. The concern here is the encroaching urban sprawl as we build new homes on old horticultural or old industrial areas without anyone being the wiser on what is in the soils.

Whilst we have become smarter when dealing with lead, and it no longer affects our IQ, the possibility of future contamination still lingers as long as we accept it in our products. No level of lead, mercury or cadmium is acceptable, and therefore the only acceptable solution is to remove them from all environmental, household and personal care products.

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Corporate Speaking Testimonials


Peter Dingle has got to be one of the best speakers on health and wellbeing in Australia. Not only qualified. Entertaining and fluent as a speaker, he ‘walks the walk’ which gives his presentation that extra credibility. My clients and staff loved him; heaps of practical points to take away and comments like ‘what a great guy, I was inspired!’

John Fitzgerald. CEO Custodian Wealth Builders
Peter has an energy and enthusiasm that few presenters possess. His knowledge and presentation style, which is laced with humour, endeared himself to our audience and had them engrossed. Almost without exception the audience wished his presentation did not have to end. Darren Mickan. General Manager nb&a events
Thank you very much for your presentation on the 5 C's which gave us great insight on how to embrace change from both an individual and team perspective. Your passionate and enthusiastic presentation had a very positive impact on our team. Garry Moore. National Manager Risk States, CGU Workers Compensation.State manager WA.
As a follow up to your request for feedback on your presentation at the IT Vision User Group Conference held on 10 February 2010 firstly could I thank you for the time that you were able to spend with the delegates. Based on the conference evaluation of 4.8 (out of 5.0) the presentation was very much appreciated and very well received by all present. The people that attended the conference I feel sure will be more inspired and better informed about taking control of their life and meeting the challenges they face especially those delegates that may be impacted by the Local Government Reform process. Bruce Wittber. BHW Consulting
Wow! As usual the Plenary Session was an event not to be missed as Peter Dingle, our home-grown health and environment guru told the audience about the “Dingle DEAL”. His presentation was enthusiastic and inspirational, entwined with memorable stories and spiced with lots of laughter. Dr Pete was very motivating. He took complex scientific information and converted it so that it was dynamic, easy to understand and informative. The “Dingle DEAL” is a structured way for each of us to avoid ill-health.
Diet: encouraging the listener to eat well and abandon processed foods that have little nutritional value,
Environment: energising the audience to quit the use of chemical products in the homes,
Attitude: enlivening those listening to choose to think positively.
Lifestyle: inspiring the audience to look towards food health by exercising, avoiding busyness and taking time to reflect on our journey.
Conference participants came away from the final session of the weekend on a high note encouraged to make a difference to their lives, their families and the children we educate. Dr Peter Dingle left us animated and enthusiastic to use the DEAL.
Carol Moelands The Western Australian Association of Teacher Assistants Inc - Sept 2009
Dr Dingle... probably the most energising, directly challenging and immediatley rewarding presentation we have ever had at a leadership forum; certainly the most talked about afterwards.. Thanks Peter for rallying us to action.. Donald Clarke, Program Coordinator, Southern Region Leadership Forum
Just quickly Peter some great feedback. Our delegates loved your presentation and although we are all now eating oats and fruit only, which we hold you personally responsible for, we very much enjoyed your presentation. Kind regards. Evan G Hammond CA
Your workshop was the buzz of the office for several weeks and is still referred to at various times even 3/4 months after the event. The group hypnotism was very effective and people were amazed that it actually worked on them. I have noticed your books on various desks in the office with people referring to them or suggesting others borrow and have a read.We would love to get you back for another conference in the near future.
PS ... We are still waiting for the day when we all start barking and looking for our left leg. Regards . Vickie Douglas Head of Direct and Alliance Banking AMP Banking.
I just wanted to touch base one last time to thank you for your fantastic presentation to our group last Thursday morning. There were many motivated people leaving the room, and I honestly think you made a difference to each attendees' life in some way or other! I wanted to share with you the presenter ratings we collected, out of 5: and the results for your breakfast presentation were knowledge 4.9, presentation 4.8 and content 4.9. That is a fantastic result, so thank you again. I wish you all the best with your future endeavours, and maybe we will get you back to speak to another group some time in the future! Erin Hasleby. CPA Australia WA Member Events Coordinator
I’d just like to thank you on behalf of the sales force at Steel Blue, I have never seen our guys as fired up as they have been since your session. It really was inspiring. Peter Dingle was fantastic, I can’t rave enough about him. His tips on Taking Charge of your Life have struck a chord with all our sales force. It really was life changing and inspiring stuff. Thanks so much for you help. Ebony Fitzgerald. Sales and Promotions Representative Footwear Industries Pty Ltd Makers of Steel Blue Premium Industrial Footwear
Peter Dingle gave a series presentations to the Institute of Chartered Accountants Business Forum 2007. His energy and his magic livened up the conference. His presentations were extremely well received as was his presence and interaction
throughout the whole day, which was an added bonus and energised the conference staff. Brian Martin. Training & Development Manager – WA. The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia
Thank you Peter for a wonderful presentation, we have had a great amount of positive feedback from all who attended. We do appreciate your efforts and expect to see some positive results within our team that have been influenced by your presentation. Best Wishes, and we will be in contact soon with the possibility of another presentation opportunity for you. Maria Gutta. Brentnalls
Dr Dingle made us sit up, take notice of the world around us and truly
believe that we could and should be doing things differently, in our
work and in our lives. He deftly motivated us for the rest of the day
when we went out and did volunteer activities in natural areas around
Perth." Colleen Henry. Strategic and Corporate Planner. Tourism Western Australia
Just wanted to say how much I enjoyed your talk at the NAPSA conference last week. I'd heard the goss, heard of the Dr D legend, now I've seen it for myself. Well done! Peter Quayle. Promotions & Special Projects Coordinator. Prospective Students & Admissions Centre Division of Enterprise & International. Murdoch University.
We all enjoyed your presentation - lots of smiling faces around the
workshop .... still. The health message was simple and compelling and
you made it fun. Ron Zatella. A/Manager Fleet Services. Fire & Emergency Services Authority
Many thanks for your wonderful presentation to ChallengerTafe's CAPS
forum last Thursday. You have inspired us all to reflect on our lifestyle, health, and environment and work towards making changes to our "busy " lives.
Once again many thanks for a wonderful day, Julie Manning Program Manager Visage Training Centre for Hair, Fashion and Beauty Challenger TAFE
just wanted to send you a quick note to inform you of the overwhelming amount of positive feedback I have received for the presentation that you conducted for FESA last Wednesday, it would appear that people are still talking about it . Your work was extremely well received, many people have reassessed their lifestyles and I believe a few of them have even been out to your healthy eating cafe in Fremantle. ………….Your presentation was entertaining, informative but in particular highly motivational………. I know that most people would not leave one of your talks without taking away something of value so in the interest of improving the health, happiness and overall wellbeing of FESA . On behalf of myself and FESA thankyou again for your valuable time and quality performance. Janine Blacklow A/Safety Advisor FESA
Our district administrators were in awe of Dr Dingle as his inspirational style and obvious commitment to Health and Well Being were displayed. The "Dingle Deal" will be a foundation on which school administrators will be able to build a Health and Well Being program for their staffs. A highly motivational presentation from an exemplary speaker.... Well done and thankyou Dr D." Paul Mather Manager District Operation Esperance District Education Office
Thank You Peter! Really, your presentation was a sublime blend of humour, interesting facts and a compelling lesson to all in attendance of the importance of health and lifestyle. Almost affording “rock star” status, it was wonderful to see the REIWA staffers flocking around keen to secure you for their state awards night! The members have thanked me for asking you along and I am most grateful for the time and energy you put into your talk. My office staff went and bought Omega 3 capsules on the way to the office! Thanks again, it was a pleasure meeting you. Hayden Groves. dethridgeGROVES
Dr Peter Dingles presentation to our Family Day Care team on Nutrition and Lifestyle was both informative and entertaining. Family Day Care staff and providers walked away with the determination to change their lives and importantly the lives of the children in their care by simply making more informed choices when it comes to providing meals for children and for their own families. We are all in the process of reconditioning ourselves. Eddie Powell, Co-ordinator Children’s Services. Communicare Inc
Dr Peter Dingle was an excellent speaker. He held the audiences attention, was very entertaining and had so much information to share. He contacted us well before the event and was very organized. He was flexible with his arrangements and tailored his presentation so that it had greater meaning for the audience. Jason Hughston. LJ Hooker.
G’day Peter, and thank you for your presentation last Friday. It was certainly very well receive by many of the delegates. Here is what some of them said.
Peter Dingle was inspiring and motivating (I write it down!!)
More Dingle stuff next year.
Peter Dingle presentation fantastic
Dr Peter Dingle was top class.
Peter Dingle was so engaging and informative and entertaining. A great way to end the day.
Thanks. Don Phillips. Administrators' Project Officer
Dr Dingle burst forth with a hard hitting and entertaining 30 minute presentation which captured the attention of the audience. Given the diversity of people present this was no mean feat. You can tell that Dr Dingle’s message had got across to the target audience because they continued to quote him for days afterwards. Stuart Jardine, CEO Gosnells City Council.
Just a short note to congratulate you on your presentation at the MEA
Conference. The feedback that I received from those who attended over the course of the two days was exceptional. Thank you for your efforts. GUY ALESSANDRO. Director of Sales Rendezvous Observation City Hotel
Your presentation was fantastic , full of energy and humour. I was only in there for a short time as I was producing the video highlights. I ended up buying your book as we are expecting a little one in august I need all the help I can get for to fit into this “dad” role. Anthony Vallario CSEP, AMIAA. Producer/Director. ZOOM Photography & Video Productions
Peter Dingle was great! He blended 5 "C's" into his talk on the night, which fitted in with our "C" theme and his magic and sleight of hand amazes and amused everyone. Annie Payne. Membership, Marketing and Events Co-ordinator RACP
Dr Peter Dingle presented a one hour session at our staff conference this week. His presentation covered his four “C’s” of taking control of your life. Peter presentation was full of little ‘gems’ of information as well as being very entertaining. Feedback from staff has been very positive with many comments stating that Peter was very motivational and highly entertaining speaker. Marisa Leccese. WA Marketing Manager. CRS Australia
"Inspiring!!" - Karina Hawkins, Woodside Engery Ltd
"Upbeat and humorous but with some serious messages about being healthy" - Tony Flynn, Woodside Energy Ltd
"I found Peter interesting and a great deal of his information was a big REMINDER for me" - Linda Davies, Woodside Energy Ltd
"I thought that it was really interesting, very energized & also amusing at the same time! A good balance. Thanks" - Alison Nannup, Woodside Energy Ltd.
"Very high energy, some good content...got some good tips out of it...." - Emma Dowd, Woodside Energy Ltd.
"I thought he was great. Very motivating and hugely energetic. He definitely got me thinking about a number of aspects of my life.
I think it's really beneficial to have sessions like that and a facilitator with Peter's personality makes all the difference" - Jodie Lancaster, Woodside Energy Ltd.
Dr Dr D I enjoyed your talk/ presentation/ aerobics/ juggling/ etc yesterday morning
at E Central - think I was inspired by what you said except it took me a
while to get focused for I can not remember the last time I was
'confronted' by such enthusiasm. Thanks for the 'shot in the arm' to get motivated!
Mary Anne Baljic. Head of Department. Technology & Enterprise. Perth Modern School
Peter, thanks very much for an informative and entertaining session. The talk brought together all of the the aspects of healthy living: including diet, exercise, stress management, attitude, fulfilling work and fun... it was well received by our Business Unit and reminded our busy people of the most important aspects of staying fit and healthy to be able to enjoy life and be productive in the best sense. Vivienne Sommerville, HR Manager, ABU, Woodside.
Again, thanks for your inspiring presentation on 'Taking Control'. I've already had great feedback, from the volunteers and staff present, and incidentally, the 'non-smiler' in the crowd (if you recall, bearded, grumpy looking) told me you were the best speaker he's ever heard! Kellie Bennett. Cochburn Council.
Hi Dr D. My father has taken me to so many goal setting seminars in my life and pushed me to read so many goal setting books, and I never got anywhere with them. However after your seminar, I have written my goals, they are up on my wall, and I am well on the way to achieving them mentally and then actually ! I felt like both you and Ralph were speaking to only me, like there was no one else in the room. I spoke to a few others who said they felt the same thing. That is amazing, that you can hit the hearts of so many people at the one time. Thank you for your passion for your job, which passes on as passion to us.
p.s. have also started to read The D.E.A.L. cant wait for the new book to come out so I can read that too. Ali Binskin. Enjo Consultant
Peter Dingle was a fantastic addition to our conference program. A delegation of 500 farmers is not an easy group to sell a story on “life balance” – but they hung on to his every word and in the post conference surveys rated Peter’s presentation among the very best in what was a high calibre speaking line up. Peter is a consummate professional and just great to deal with. We’d certainly recommend you do a “Dingle deal”. Esther Price. Director. Esther Price Promotions. Communication, marketing and event management
On behalf of the NAGCAS Conference steering committee, I would like to extend our appreciation for the magnificent keynote presentation which you delivered on the opening day of our national conference. Your message on the 5 C's for controlling one's life opened the minds of many delegates and gave them insights and tools which they can effectively pass on to their clients and just as importantly, to themselves. Comments ranged from "awesome and entertaining" to "inspirational and doable". There were many other informative presentations throughout the conference pertaining to career development matters, but yours stood out because of your passion, humour, integrity, the message and its magic.
And thanks again for stepping in so swiftly. You really are a star.Alexandra Semmens NAGCAS, Conference Steering Committee
‘…your contribution during the summit and at the dinner were a delight. Not only were they lively and pertinent but later, also fun.” Robin Williams ABC Science Show
Peter's "DEAL" message mixed in with magic and expertise had members and guests of the Secret Harbour Surf Club's 10 Year Gala Dinner glued to their seats. Many were relieved that they were on the right track and others had some take home messages to help improve their lives and their children's with some simple rules of thumb, all relating back to the Diet.. Environment...Attitude and Lifestyle... Peter's interactive speaking style involves the audience and makes listening to his message an enjoyable experience. Jane Le Grove Director Of House Secret Harbour SLSC.
We would very much like to extend our appreciation for your brilliant, informative, entertaining, and energetic talk last month. Mary Paul President OSWA.
‘The session was well received. It is still being talked about today (3 weeks later).’ Daniel Parry. Deakin Financial Services.
Dr D is a most infectious and emotive speaker who involves his audience and well deserves the description of a charismatic academic” Peter Hicks. Health -Mor Industries.
Peter's gift of interaction and people skills is a marvellous thing to watch. He drew people out at the Conference and he received an enormousamount of feedback in the 2 hours he was with us. His ability to bring thebest out in people turned a simple presentation into an enjoyable activityfor all staff. At all times Peter approached his presentation with vigour and dedicationand his friendly manner and willingness to participate, coupled with hisindustry experience meant that Peter was a valuable contribution to ourAustraland conference.
It is important to keep all staff focussed and a "healthy and motivatedemployee is a happy employee", so I would highly recommend Peter for anysimilar presentation for which Australand is already beginning to benefit.Should any prospective Company wish to discuss the contents of thisreference I would be pleased to do so. Matthew James Joyce Executive General Manager - Land & Housing – Australand
'Peter gave a presentation of such energy that it completely revitalised the audience and sent them away contemplating the changes they would make.The Deal is a great topic and would have relevance to the lives of anyone listening - something to make you really stand back and think. Wendy Wardell
Boy what a great presentation you did, you got a mention at the closing from the Director General saying what a great presentation. Well done. Diana
'Peter has communication skills of the highest order and an ability to convey technical information in terms appropriate to the existing knowledge level of the audience...reflected in the high ratings received in student post-course evaluations.' Trades and labour Council.
“enjoyed peter enthusiastic presentation 10,10,10” for presentation, quality and content” Evelyn Vojtisek Fashion Carpet House.
“Charismatic enthusiasm 9,10, 9” for presentation, quality and content” Adrian Lengkeek. JBA Carpet Court.
“You certainly have hidden talents! Can I compliment you on the sensitive way you turned an event that dealt with a dreadful disease into a tasteful and humorous evening, perfectly suited to the mood of the audience.” Bob Kuchera MLA. Minister for Health. WA
“he has carried out these tasks with a sense of energy, flair and enthusiasm, acting always in a very professional manner.” Barry Mac Kinnon Ex leader of the WA liberal party.
“Your delivery was excellent and clearly held the attention of the group. The juggling trick had the desired impact because, like the ‘D.E.A.L’, it was topical for the business/life jugglers and, of course, it was clever and skilful. The speed of delivery was appropriate to the audience and your time keeping was just about perfect.” Andrew Robertson. BHP Steel.
“The feedback I got was that your presentation was excellent! Thank you very much. Paul Holmes. Environmental Consultant.
“I thought your speel at the coast to coast conference was the highlight. Finally someone speaking the truth rather than saying everything was hunky dory and no need to change anything” Evan Broaman Environment Resource Officer. Local Government Association of Tasmania.
"Peter Dingle gave our Kordel's Vitamin Launch presentations in Adelaide
and Perth an additional dimension. Peters presentational style lends an up-beat tone
to the topic." Peter Kemp Healthcare Manufacturing Group
first off I would like to thank you for all of your fantastic information and enthusiasm at the Small Business Development Corporation staff development day. I got a lot out of it and also loved your book. I am very much a DEAL believer . I am so grateful to benefit from
your dedication and sensibility. It's all so easy really - I think that was something that you really conveyed at the seminar - back to basics - keep it simple and logical - and you're right our grandparents did some funny old things for a damn good reason. Jane Gardiner. Small Business Development Corporation

Thank you once again for an extremely interesting day. I learnt a huge amount and feel very motivated to attend further sessions. I felt reassured that I'm also heading in the right direction with many of the things I am doing. Thank you, Lesley Harmsen
'The information you gave was stimulating and interesting.....We truly appreciate the support you have given us.' Hospital Environmental Awareness Link.
I was fortunate enough to attend your lecture at Macquarie University last Wednesday evening. Thank you so much, it was what I’d been waiting for since reading your books 2 years ago. I certainly came away with even more than I expected, hoping that you could reach millions more Australians through your unique style! Caroline Nelson. Enjo Consultant
We were very sorry to have missed you when you visited the East Coast but await with baited breath for your return. Those who were privileged enough to catch you said it was something not to be missed. However, we have been listening to the CDs. Tracey McWhinnie. ENJO Consultant
firstly, thanks for your fantastic presentation you did at Macquarie University for Enjo, I was one of the consultants in the audience. I have read your book and found it absolutely fanscinating - well done. So many myths, so much deception by the food industry.
I love your advice, and your simple, easy to read format, and am adopting, slowly but surely your suggestions for diet, have already changed to fibre based cleaning, obviously, and am referring back to the book for further advice on changes I can make for the good of my family. Thank you for taking the time and determination to inform us, it is appreciated and I am spreading the word as much as I possibly can so that others can know the truth, Kathy Grime. Enjo Team Manager
Never have I had the 3 D's before!! Thank you for your great, invigorating talk this morning. Robyn Forshaw. Conference Steering Committee
that was an absolutely brilliant presentation last night!! I wish I had that
much passion when I talk! Fiona Tremlett. Melaleuca
As we all arrived at the Esplanade Hotel Freo on the Friday afternoon after a few buzy days at workshops in the office, we where keen for a few pre-dinner drinks and then dinner, then for a few of us, kicked on a little in Freo, and where a little worse for wear at the 09.00am start, but as the Dingle "DEAL" was so enlightening all where captured by his enthusiasm, wit and humour. We all enjoyed the "DEAL" and are still talking about it, we also purchased a few of his books for the home and the office. The rest of the weekend we where very aware. Thanks &Regards. Ian Radford Marubeni-Itochu Tubulars Oceania Pty Ltd
“Very good, very good, very good, Excellent coverage of some very important life skills which should be taught at high school. Saf Deakin Finances
“Excellent I will commit to all the principles outlined on all the presentations. I feel empowered now.” Jenny. Deakin Finances
“Brilliant, everyone knows they should set goals but by doing it in a interesting way really opens your mind to setting your goals and achieving them…Overall fantastic” Ben. Deakin Finances
“Well done, was excellent” Fabian. Deakin Finances
I am a mother of four beautiful very healthy children, Manager with ENJO and was a Midwife for 17 years. I attended your presentation for ENJO Consultants this morning at City West and just had to write and say thank you so much. I didn't want it to end it was so informative and inspiring. I love selling ENJO and training consultants to do the same but I love it even more now knowing just how much we are doing, in our own small way, to help improve people's lives. The five girls in my Team who were all there also thoroughly enjoyed it and I know will now approach the Demos they do with more knowlege and confidence. Thank you once again and I can't wait to read your book. Odette Askew
I was very much looking forward to hearing him in person, having read quite a bit of his work, and because I was a nurse before I started my ENJO career.
I found Dr Dingle's words very inspiring and incredibly interesting - and three of my customers also attended the Seminar and found him very informative and vibrant. Dr Dingle speaks so well. He maintained everyone's interest the whole time and managed to give out the information in such a way that everyone retained the knowledge without realising how much they had taken in.
Our health is our most important asset, without good health we have nothing, and prevention is must better than cure. Dr Dingle gave all of us many ways of preventing illness by just doing simple tasks like opening windows, airing bed linen and taking regular exercise - the DINGLE DEAL is an inspiration to us all. Melian Tomsett, Manager
Thank you for your great lecture at Deakin University. I was one of the 555 Principals sitting in the audience. You certainly know how to deliver an excellent presentation on a vital topic. I will be making some changes to my life- the first is to do some weight training as I am 58 - retired at 55 for a week and came back ???
Please keep up the good work and I will be purchasing some of your books
Well done 10/10 and a Black Elephant Stamp !!!!
Trevor Smithson. Silvan PS. Melbourne Victoria
My husband attended a Training and Development Association meeting about 2 years or so ago at which you spoke. Within about a month he had given up smoking and joined Perth Pirates dragon boat club. Over that time he has regained much of his enthusiasm and strength, which was badly depleted over the previous 20 yrs, and depression, partly through work stress and losing our daughter in 1990 through MV trauma, had been an ongoing problem. Our vege garden is now flourishing (a direct reflection of his state of mind). He will be paddling/sweeping in the Bridge to Bridge event next Sunday, a 12km Narrows Bridge to Fremantle Left Bank--event. I had mentioned to him previously over the fifteen years since we have been living down the road from the Dragon Boat club, that he might be interested...all to no avail, so you must have hit the spot and said somthing that gelled. I also had given up on his ever stopping smoking.
So I thought I would say thank-you and let you know you made a difference.
Lesla Soulsby